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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
and create an environment so he could win politically. he set up after this quotation a rare weekend session in the senate where he had two votes . no republican amendments were allowed, and he showed republicans were obstructionists and would not go along with what he thought was good for the country. this was a ploy designed to shift attention from the democrats' ability to go along with what republicans wanted to do to republican saying they did not want to do what democrats wanted to do. he was seeking to control the agenda. that is the real issue here. there are times when minorities of both parties will obstruct the majority because they need or want to. the real issue in the debate today is one of agenda control. -- we have a way to think about this. in political science, if you look at the way house majority participate, it tells us about the way the senate majority is trying to behave today. they try to structure the environment so they can win, and they do so, but controlling the agenda at preventing the minority from participating in the process. that is not a surprise to anyone.
on t.v. commercials painting themselves as the great greatest friend the environment had. i want to throw up when i see those things on the network news but they are run them all the time. >> absolutely. >> they are slick, you know. they are like those that wal-mart was running, look at these women and minorities that work at wal-mart, you know, and bp, they have these people down there talking about what a great company they are and how much they have done to clean up the environment. so they are waging a huge pr campaign to try to get their reputation back. >> absolutely. i mean it would have been great if, as part of the criminal settlement that the department of justice got that they forced -- that they would have forced bp to disclose what their advertising and marketing budget has been. bp has been giving lots of cash to the tourism bureaus of gulf states. >> yeah. buying them off. >> i am all for the gulf states trying to get folks back to that great part of the country, but we need to be honest here, that this was a corporation that has a lo
, that's a target-rich environment is what we refer to california. they raise taxes again. they sent the message that the unions are going to continue to control the process out there. they defeated proposition 32. they passed proposition 30 which was the increase in their taxes. so, california businessmen and women are looking at their bottom line saying, where are we going to go? other places? >> governor, is it too much of a leap to say when we do this at the federal level they leave the country, bilss can eventually leave the country. >> sure. >> but we can't seem to make the leap to say that. and i'm talking about the fiscal cliff now. i wonder if you were at 25% of gdp, if the government had grown to this size where it is right now and you were trying to figure out how to deal with it and you were in charge, would it be all about -- would the first thing you come up with be raising taxes? would not -- wouldn't you address the spending -- wouldn't you address the spending side of -- >> right. >> -- and, you know, the republicans are trying to criticize the obama proposals by say
environment. i'm not saying that they are more welcoming to media attention, but they came of age in a world where they -- remember, look, justice scalia has written a book, justice thomas has written a book, justice breyer. william o. douglas, justice sonia sotomayor is writing a book. i think it's great when they go out in public and write books and talk about it and become a little more accessible. >> it's funny about "the brethren" because the law clerks born before "the brethren" feel that byron white's relationship with this clerks changed bought he was furious about the leaks, determined to figure out who leaked and the clerks think something changed and the rules in the chambers and conversations with the justices, et cetera. i don't knee whether the justice -- all their attitudes have changed but when you look at newspaper articles that were written at the time to disclose chambers, written by eddie has lazarus, and sure surrogates who were saying this young man should be tarred and feathered, and scalia said if any of his law clerks did that, he would hunt them down. i think some w
environment. we have different politics in some sense. and yet divided government all the same. so there's some similarities and differences and we're going to hear from some wonderful people to talk about that. i'll go in order on my immediate right, ron elving, a george mason adjunct faculty member. his day job is senior washington editor of npr for a number of years. he's on "talk of the nation" among other things an under his direction npr has received numerous awards. he was also the political editor of "usa today" and has written bobbings on the congress. next to him, jackie colmes, a journalist with "the new york times," hopefully she'll be reporting on this event. hopefully. wishful thinking. she's been a longtime reporter not only with "the new york times" but "the wall street journal" on budget and economic matters and tax policy covering the white house and congress. worked for "c.q." herself early on. and next to her, joe min-yard who has been at the scene, behind the days at a number of the -- dice at -- deist at a number of these -- dais at a number of these events. he was
and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec task forces, elected state officials and corporate representatives close the doors to press and public, and together approve the bills that will be sent out to america. but americans have no idea they come from alec, unless someone like a mark pocan exposes it. >> when i went down to new orleans, to the alec convention last august, i remember going to a workshop and hearing a little bit about a bill they did in florida and some other states. and there was a proposal to provide special-needs scholarships. and lo and behold all of a sudden i come back to wisconsin, and what gets introduced? get ready. i know you're going to have a shocked look on your face. a bill to do just that. >> 26 alec members in the wisconsin legislature sponsored that special-needs bill, but the real sponsor was alec. pocan knew because the bill bore a striking resemblance to alec's model. have a look. but pocan isn't only concerned that alec sneaks bills into the state legislature. the intent behind the bills troubles him too. >> some of their legislation sound
. >> that was the process in 1986. can that happen this day? >> it feels like a different environment. i do not know, but right now we are in the middle of a political test of wills on marginal tax rates. it is interesting we're not fighting on the underlying principle, which is that wealthy ought to pay more in order to help us close debts and deficits, get our economy back on track. right now the president thinks he won a point, was vindicated by his victory in the election, and republicans did not want to do that, but he has the hand in this struggle. restoring the clinton tax rates is something i would support. we supported them back in 1991 when bill clinton was running for president. no problem on that. it is a reasonable adjustment, but may not be sufficient to reach the targets we need and it does not help us in bipartisan bargaining, reaching a deal. i hope as this negotiation -- we ought to be at the irish times -- that they will not make a fetish of marginal tax rates street if they should go up some, but do they need to go back where they work? i do not know. lots of ways to increase tax
they need to go to camp david and get out of the environment to get a deal done here. >> i think that would be a great idea. the co-founder of no labels with me wrote a column in "the daily beast" talking about the leadership principles we need to put in place, which is to tell the truth and no more budgetary gimmicks and govern for the future, which means plans that address growth, opportunity and fairness and put the country first, put partisanship aside and take responsibility and work together. all those things mean let's get in the room together. let's quit the public posturing. let's get down to business. these are too consequenceal as to get the show going now. >> i have to ask you, the president could not have been more clear. i point back to the exit polling, and even his first news conference after being re-elected that the line in the sand where tax rates for the wealthiest americans that make over 250,000le, if you can't start at that point when you have congressman cole, a republican, saying this is what must be done and everybody behind the scenes agrees. the first proposal i
is the honorable sherman, under secretary for natural resources and environment at the u.s. department of agriculture. he has a holiday message to share with you as well. [applause] >> speaker boehner, senators udall and bennett, congressman tipton and distinguished guests, on behalf of the secretary, tom vilsack and our chief of the forest service, i would like to say a few words if i can. each year, the capitol christmas tree comes from the u.s. forest service, which is an agency within usda and eachier we -- each year we select that tree from a different forest. this tree is from a small town called meeker, colorado in the white river national forest in the high mountain areas of colorado. and it's a a spruce tree and 73 feet tall and happens to be 74 years old. it's only the third time in colorado's history that colorado has provided the capitol christmas tree and i'm particularly proud of that since i'm a colorado resident. yay, colorado! [cheers and applause] >> we call this the people's tree for good reason and that's because it comes from our public lands, which are owned by al
groups, such as the global climate coalition, information council for the environment, heartland institute, annapolis center, and cooler heads coalition are created or enlisted to propagate this message of doubt. deniers question the motives and engage in harassment of the real credentialed climate scientists. well, for the record, there has been scientific debate regarding climate change. ideas have been tested, theories have been ventured, and the evidence keeps coming back to the same conclusion: increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere from human-related sources is strengthening the greenhouse effect, adding to recent warming, and acidifying the oceans. actually, the evidence coming in tends to confirm the worst and most dangerous projections. mr. president, may i interrupt my remarks and ask unanimous consent that morning business be extended until 2:00 p.m. with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. whitehousemr. whitehouse: ak unanimous consent that that exchange be moved to the beginning or the end
's in your wallet? it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management >>> we are taking a look at the top cnn trends. he's the dude that lost his car in "dude where's my car" now ashton kutcher is playing the role of steve jobs. >> those are two very different characters. >> i would say so. it's one of the greatest and innovative american minds ever. >> the resemblance to a young steve jobs right out of the cradle of computers, it's pretty striking. michelle turner has that for us from hollywood. >> reporter: yes, just a few weeks the world will get its first look at the new movie about steve jobs. but we can share the first image from the film which stars ashton kutcher as the legendary man behind apple. this is the photo of kutcher in costume as jobs. he has the beeld and the long hair parted on the side. that was his look back in the day. critics are
a reduction in the amount of carbon and an improvement in the environment as well as national security hawks conservative can see the idea of producing more in our country, leaving more resources at home and spending less of our wealth abroad. so we see this as a way of not creating a zero sum game but doing something different, which is create ago consensus in order to get something done in the next congress. and so we're excited for the next congress. we're excited to work with all legislators and the administration to implement these recommendations and see it through to their fulfillment. right now i'd like to call mr. smith, fred smith, who's the championship, c.e.o., president and founder of fedex. he needs to introduction. he burns about 1.5 billion gallons of fuel a day -- a year, sorry. [laughter] that would really be a problem. but the truth is, you know, the fedex and what it's done in our economy is groundbreaking. they are the clipper ships of the modern age, and what they see both in terms of the economic growth of our country, you know, because they touch every industry, as we
environments, a whole host of reforms that need to be undertaken. i think the government is starting to make moves in this direction, which is good. but these reforms have been taking a long time to take hold. and we're not going to see an immediate difference. >> how much does brazil suffer if the fact that argentina is itself suffering so much? is there a lack of potential opportunity maybe in the export markets for some of its neighbors that is part of the issue? >> there's part of the issue. ironically, i think argentina suffers more from the fact that brazil has been basically flat lining the past 12 months and that's exacerbated problems in argentina's own growth model. brazil is not so particular an open economy. it only exports around 15% of gdp. so it's not a very open economy. and actually, a lot of these problems are more domestic than they are external. >> that's a fascinating point. i want to come back to you in a second. in egypt, tens of thousands have taken to the streets of cairo last night to protest against the decree by the egyptian president mohamed morsi that grants him
, a report about the problem will be presented to the city council's transportation and environment committee. >>> the public has been invited to a meeting tonight about the search for a new police chief for san jose. during that meeting, city officials will ask for ideas about what quality should be considered in evaluating candidates for the job. the meeting is due to begin at 67:30 at the mayfair community center. >>> want to check in with tara again. >> there is a new accident on 680 southbound. there is a car blocking the lane there. it doesn't appear to be causing too much of a backup. right now we're gonna head outside and you can see the east shore freeway is pretty much a mess. i have red arrows that about all the way from the bay bridge up to richmond. so different yourself some extra time if you need to head west on interstate 80. up next we'll take a look at the bay bridge toll plaza. you can see there is a lot of traffic here. it's been like this since about 6:00 this morning. give yourself some extra time if you need to head into san francisco. 280 in san jose, the traffic is no
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have people saying how the white house has had a change of tune. this is the type of environment we are in. as far as the big pitcher goes, the market is showing some resiliency considering we have had weeks after weeks of worries on the fiscal cliff, and yet we're still pulling off some up arrows. take a look at cold and macy's. both have come under some pressure. noting hurricane sandy, macy's same-store sales fell, also mentioned sandy as well. kohl's down 10%. lori: thank you, nicole. an upward revision appeared tonight, but our next guest expects growth to decline for the fourth quarter. deutsche bank security nominee with his outlook for next year, and if we get to it, some expectations on continued stimulus which we heard this week as well. this was the second print out of three on third-quarter gross domestic product. looks like a nice upward provision. about 2%, but if you look under the hood there are some serious problems and i will let you start there. >> a little bit of fine print. consumer spending was revised lower, business investment in equipment and software. for t
begin with feeding america, maggie? because america's food environment has so many -- is laden with problems. >> one in five children in 50 million food impoverished americans, 1 in 5 are children. i think this news really struck howard buffett by surprise in his own hometown of decatur. i think two-thirds of the high school students are taking free lunches. and that, he said, was in a town where food processing is its home. >> exactly. >> and he basically decided, this is a problem we can fix. as he says in the piece, he wants to put hunger in america out of business, which does sound a lot like his dad. >> hard to do because you have to also look at the food and how it's made and the processing is such a part of the problem because you can have a hungry child who's also obese. and it doesn't make sense, but when you look at the way food is prepared and what is fed to these children when they can eat, it's not a good option for them. >> it's not, but you know, howard says, too, that there's no shortage of food, good produce food, in america that farmers either don't farm or ha
environment, it is going to result in some people not running for office. host: we want to get some information regarding the new members of congress. they can find that at the national journal website. that is in addition to the congressional management foundation website. in pennsylvania on the line for republicans. thanks for waitingt. caller: every time i used to watch congress, there was one congresswoman in the black caucus. she always had two family members as staff members behind her. first, it was two gentleman. then it was two 1 in. is that allowed? -- then it was two women. is that allowed? in some parts of government, if you are not allowed to hire family members. is that still going on? guest: a great question. nepotism is prohibited in the house and senate. you are not allowed to hire immediate family members. the only exceptions that exist are that this was imposed some years ago. i think only one spouse was grandfathered in who was the chief of staff for her husband and member of congress. i will not say who, but they are retiring. you cannot hire immediate family me
because it's such a masculine environment, you try to mask everything. if you hurt your ankle, you fake it and run it off like nothing's wrong. especially if you have an emotional or mental problem. you're certainly going to mask it. along the way if you don't you're going to get weeded out. football is a game of attrition. the weak don't make it to the top levels. so you mask any issues or demons that you may have so that you can get to that top level. i think it's a disservice, quite honestly, to the individuals in the games. because statistics will tell you that there are a couple guys in the nfl that have mental issues and it doesn't get addressed often enough. >> back to joe linta for a second. we know jovan went to the field and the facility and he talked to his coaches. i mean, he was talking to them with a gun to his head. why do you think his instinct after he kills his girlfriend, the baby in the other room, would be to go and thank his coaches? >> i think the instinct would have been the kind of young man that he was and the way he was raised that, you know, he probably -- i
] >> grover! >> stephanie: norquist and maria commented this is a different environment than the 1990s. grover said we got four years of bad regulation, higher taxes. he wants to add more taxes to the tea party too. it will starve tea party i if obama pushes us over the cliff. [ screaming ] >> can't just wait for tea party three. >> probably about 150 billion. >> stephanie: that would be bad. okay. oh, let's see. phillip in durham disagrees with everything i say. about everything? >> ever! >> stephanie: hi, phillip. >> caller: hi, stephanie. look. appreciate the show. i think you have not been fair to the facts and let me just ask you from the -- what we're talking about -- >> stephanie: the facts are oversensitive in my opinion. >> caller: that's why you're better as a comedian than a political pundit. >> stephanie: all right. >> caller: the fact of the matter is simply this. timothy geithner proposed a budget plan that was already presented to the senate and was voted down 99-0. have you told your listeners t
the information back. it is a little inefficient but it makes for a much happier work environment. >> how many hours are there in a mars day? >> 24 hours and 40 minutes. >> bill: so then you have to calculate that. >> what happens is your day starts 40 minutes later and it gets weird when it gets like 2:00 in the morning. >> bill: all right now we want to talk about mars. first, i have to ask you about the earlier in the week, maybe it was last week, i guess announcement dr. begel about finding ice on the polar caps of mercury. i don't get this. this is the hottest of the planets, is it not? and why do they have ice and why is our ice melting? is there something wrong with this picture? >> no, it's not. it is also one of the coldest planets because one side is almost always toward the sun. one side is always in space. you've got this dichotomy of a really hot surface and a really cold surface. >> bill: it doesn't rotate? >> it rotates about once every 90 days so one side is able to cool off very quickly because it is radi
around you and we all are products of our environment. the amount of contact we were taking, the amount of fire fights, rpgs, rockets, whatever it may be. that tour for us was a 15-month tour, which was it shall that's pretty long for some young people. we are there to help them out, find ways of doing the same thing they've been doing. when i wrote the book i want ed to describe the valley and the people around me. so often i'm congratulated or patted on the back and thanked and i've never done anything in the military alone. i was able to put my buddies' names in print and highlight the actionses they've done. there are so many things that we don't hear about. >> our good friend sebastien younger who talked about stalked about your heroism, your unit, and the terrible conditions. i remember reading about it. it seemed remarkable what you did. what you did and how you describe it like so many other recipients that said in the past, i did my job. it was reflex. i was trained well and i was going to save my buddies. talk about that night. and also the reluctance to be called a hero. i've
and that's what you get in living in newark, new jersey, in an urban environment where the food is not particularly cheap is tough. you're right, they're not paying for every meal and calorie he's ingesting but that's not much food. >> what's part of that discussion a twitter conversation where somebody said the state shouldn't be responsible for nutrition, right? and because part of the problem here is that people who are food stamps don't have access to really healthy food. you see cory booker made his, you know, best attempt at getting healthy food, frozen vegetables, canned beans and things like that. that is part of the problem with nutrition and poverty stricken areas. >> and that amount. we have to take a short break. >> [ inaudible ]. >> still ahead -- >> have a job, son. >> you do. i'm going to check you. >> "the new york post" and its photographer taking heat over the cover photo of a man taking minutes before his death he was crushed by the train. did the paper cross the line in publishing that picture. we'll talk about that coming up. lashawn's got her christmas list
always on the eye of creating an environment where businesses can grow and provide great jobs and great careers going forward. i think that's the most important thing is to stay focused on what the job is at hand. >> and anything about the cup holders? >> well, you can have big cups or small cups. >> what else do you have in the car, though? internal, people like gadgets now. do they have the maps and everything like that? >> we have my lincoln touch system which is really the latest and greatest in human machine interfaces, it's really nice. you can command the vehicle with your voice. and you can do it with the swipe of your finger, of course. but probably the neat thing we have is a new push button transmission. and instead of your traditional shifter -- >> it if you're chrysler -- >> push, drive or reverse. what's neat about it, it freed up the instrument panel, the center console to be really beautiful now. because we don't have that big, clunky, shift mechanism. i think you'll find some new things. >> does it have a great democratic name? postmaster general from the '30s and '40s?
because i believed that we needed to continue to have an economic environment, an economic climate that has stability and encourages growth and encourages jobs. i'm sure we can all agree that there is more work that needs to be done. but i'm hopeful in the days, the weeks, the months and the year ahead that we can finally come together, not as democrats and not as republicans, but as americans who are concerned about the future and concerned about that next generation. in doing so, i know that we'll tackle the challenges that our country faces. you know, i'm always proud to tell the people i meet that i represent north dakota. down here in washington, we are the envy of the nation. we have the lowest unemployment in the country, a budget surplus. we're seeing unprecedented economic growth and one of the brightest futures ahead. and to the great people of the state of north dakota, i want to express my deepest gratitude for giving me the opportunity to be north dakota's voice, the voice here in the u.s. house of representatives for the last two years. i'd also like to thank my staff
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)